10 Ways to Improve Your Game Cameras

Game cameras can be some of the most tricky coding you do. That’s why when John Nesky’s 50 Common Game Camera Mistakes from GDC 2014 went live on youtube (The talk is embedded below), I immediately watched it! We can all benefit from these lessons from Nesky for refining our cameras!

When I first started watching Nesky’s talk I didn’t think he actually had 50 mistakes nor that he could actually get to all of them in an hour talk! But not only did he do both, I also realized that he was also right about these only being some of the issues we face. Which means we should keep the conversation going!

So here are my 10 Ways to Improve Your Game Cameras as takeaways from Nesky’s talk:

  1. Use a bigger FOV for heaven’s sake! 🙂
  2. If you can use a simple camera, do it!
  3. Player’s intent should supersede camera scripts
  4. Use the camera to give the player subtle hints, but don’t be overbearing.
  5. Don’t use quick camera transitions in place of cuts. Either cut, slow down the transition, or find an in-between.
  6. If rotating, camera shouldn’t rotate in place (on its own axes). Should rotate around avatar.
  7. WATCH FOR SIMULATION SICKNESS (SS). It’s a disconnect between movement you see and movement you feel. Any movement seen and not felt can cause SS. Have options to turn off extra movement if you want to leave it in the game.
  8. Avoid jerky camera movements and constant camera angle changes, especially during combat! It not only leads to SS, but can also be disorienting to players as controlling movement changes with camera angles. It also doesn’t look as pretty, ahem, as aesthetically pleasing.
  9. Allow players to invert controls. It’s a significant portion of players that want to invert (like me!). You’ll lose players otherwise.
  10. Implement, test, iterate, test, test, test! Repeat.
  11. Re-Watch John Nesky’s talk as needed. 😉

I just love GDC talks. There’s always so many of them at the event that you literally cannot attend all of them. So thanks to GDC for posting this treasure to the public. Thanks to John Nesky for being willing to share his own mistakes so the rest of us don’t have to suffer… as much! And for the rest of us I wish a big: Good luck!

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