Assignment 8: Moving Towards 3D

NANCYNEWREN_EXAMPLEGAME 08
(Simple one-click download. Once downloaded, unzip, play the executable, enjoy!)
Controls: Use the typical WASD to move the trapezoid and see what shapes you make!

ABOUT THE PROJECT

For this weeks project I created a basic 2D mesh that I will extend next week to 3D. I started by copying the 2D sprite and shader code directly and then adding/changing to make it a mesh. Because this required a lot of steps, I did my best to do as small of chunks as possible and to always test that my code worked on every platform and every configuration after the updates. This I believe saved me big headaches as there was twice when one platform wasn’t working, but because the changes I made were fresh, and I knew the immediate changes I’d made that had resulted in the bug, I was able to fairly quickly resolve them.

To move the object I used a very simple physics equation: setting the velocity in the UpdateSimulationBasedOnInput() function to m_speed if a key was pressed for that direciton (i.e. if ‘A’ was pressed then velocity.x = -m_speed), zero when not pressed, and zero if opposing direction keys pressed at the same time. Then in the UpdateSimulationBasedOnTime(), position += velocity * time (because this is the function where we’re given the time variable, and the other function is where input updates are received). As with most games, the simulation (or game) update happens more slowly than rendering (in this case the simulation updates every ~0.066 seconds), which is why the movement appears jumpy. To get around you could obviously speed up the simulation time, but in most games the update times still differ, so the ideal solution is to calculate a predicted position and send that position to the renderer. This can be done in the submit to renderer as that funciton is given the time since the last simulation update and so a more accurate prediction can be made. (I have done this in the next assignment.)

I also created, though it was not required, a 3DObject class to manage the mesh, effect, and other variables needed for rendering a 3DObject.

One last note I wanted to mention: When rendering, because we always want our UI elements (or 2D sprites) to be seen, we always draw our 3D-objects/meshes first. This ensures us that our UI (player hud, menus, etc.), are always visible and accessible to the player.

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